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Value of Agricultural Production in Palestine From Main Group of Crops By Religion 1944 - 45 before Nakba, Plus Health and Production in Palestine before 1948 (Nakba), British Mandate: A Survey of Palestine: Volume I - Page 327. Chapter IX: Agriculture: Section 1: Agriculture Production: (c) Statistical Production: Table 7: Value of Agricultural Production From Main Group of Crops By Religion 1944 - 45. . Chapter IX: Agriculture: Section 2
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כדילתרגם לעברית
Posted on October 28, 2007
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Posted by Webmaster on June 2, 2013 #150490

CHAPTER lX.

Table 7.

VALUE OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION FROM MAIN GROUPS OF CROPS IN THE SEASON 1944-45, DISTINGUISHING BETWEEN ARAB 'AND JEWISH CULTIVATION.

I TOTALS

Grains 497,048 4,403,409 4,900,457

Vegetables 1,745,870 5,113,553 I 6,859,423

Fodder 951,178 156,847 1,108,026

Fruits 1,379,620 3,139,374 4,518,994

(excluding citrus) Olives

Melons

JEWISH

Arab

53,235 83,975

3,320,320 969,630

3,373.555 1,053,605

Totals

4,710,926

17,103,133

21,814,059

Section 2.

ANIMAL HEALTH AND PRODUCE.

(a) Animal health,

27. The presence in Palestine of a great variety of temperate and tropical diseases, and of improved and primitive stock existing in close proximity, makes the disease position particularly complex. The stage and level of agricultural development vary greatly. At one end of the scale lie the conditions in which most of the Arab-owned herds and flocks receive little or no supplementary feeding, depending on grazing which is limited at most times of the year and during the dry season is almost non-existent. In such systems of husbandry, disease due to or associated with under-nourishment or exposure are rife. The natural tendency of many of the stock-owners is not to report disease until it has assumed serious proportions. The danger of this attitude and its effects on disease-control are obvious. There exists practically every stage between these conditions and the other extreme, where improved breeds, especially of cattle and poultry, are kept under modern systems of management which, in many of the Jewish settlements, compare with those in any country and which must have few if any equals in Colonial dependencies. Here, there occur those diseases associated with intensive and close systems of husbandry the world over.

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